Blog

Longview Farm Park Events

Posted by on 11:47 am in My Blog | Comments Off on Longview Farm Park Events

Longview Farm Park Events

The major events that are held in Longview Farm Park Events are Fall Festival, Turkey Trout, Breakfast with Santa, and Sambucus Christmas parade. Fall Festival: For a few, the Town and Country Fall Festival is all about the horses. The Festival, which was held Saturday, offers the one time when riding is permitted at Longview Farm Park. “A few youngsters hold up all year to ride stallions and horses there,” said Anne Nixon, the city’s chief of parks and entertainment. The horses, seats, and tack were given by Equine Assisted...

read more

History of Longview Farm Park

Posted by on 11:42 am in Longview Farm Park | Comments Off on History of Longview Farm Park

History of Longview Farm Park

Introduction: Longview Farm now remains as an indication of a past period, while it has confronted and is still confronting numerous trials during its time long history. This arrangement will analyze a couple of those trials, yet will concentrate for the most part on the historical backdrop of the numerous structures on the homestead. Before presenting the ranch, I feel it is important to recognize everything that made this arrangement conceivable. Because of digitization endeavors by the Library of Congress, an extensive store of research...

read more

Platin Limestone

Posted by on 6:48 am in Boulders | Comments Off on Platin Limestone

Platin Limestone

Large straight-shelled cephalopods, trilobites and one of the first crinoids were common inhabitants of the warm shallow seas that covered our region during the Ordovician Period.

read more

Lamotte Sandstone

Posted by on 6:26 am in Boulders | Comments Off on Lamotte Sandstone

Lamotte Sandstone

Some 550 million years ago large amounts of sand came from the North into our region. The sand formed vast sand flats which were swept by high tides. Strange creatures like Climactichnites crawled over the flats leaving trails that look like motorcycle tracks.

read more

Granite

Posted by on 6:25 am in Boulders | Comments Off on Granite

Granite

Around 1.4 billion years ago molten rock (Magma) was injected into the earth’s crust. Buried deep in the insolating crust of the earth the magma cooled slowly allowing time for crystals to grow and form coarsely crystalline granites. These granites can be seen at Elephant Rocks State Park and at Silver Mines in the Fredericktown, Missouri area. In Longview Farm Park, Granite lies about 3000 feet below the surface. Because of the way in which granite is formed no fossils are found in granite.

read more

Rhyolite

Posted by on 6:23 am in Boulders | Comments Off on Rhyolite

Rhyolite

1.5 billion years ago Missouri was a vast area of explosive volcanism. Volcanoes and fissures spewed forth upon the earth’s surface thick layers of fast cooling rhyolite lava, volcanic ash, and volcanic fragments. This material can be seen today as hard, blocky rocks in road cuts and on Taum Sauk Mountain about 80 miles South of St. Louis. At Longview Farm Park rhyolites lie about 2800 feet beneath the surface. Some very primitive life forms lived in lakes that dotted the volcanic region. They were a form of algae that left structures...

read more

Beautiful Trees

Posted by on 6:15 am in Tree | Comments Off on Beautiful Trees

Beautiful Trees

read more

Black Walnut

Posted by on 6:09 am in Tree | Comments Off on Black Walnut

Black Walnut

Black walnut is one of the most valuable trees in Missouri. Its warm, brown wood is in great demand for furniture, cabinets, and gunstocks. Our state is the greatest production center for walnut wood and has been for over fifty years. The main clue to look for is the nut. It has a grooved shell and grows inside a thick, green husk. These nuts make the walnut tree even more valuable. The husk contains a dark-brown dye which the pioneers used to dye their cloth. They also used the bark for a yellow dye. The compound leaves have fifteen or more...

read more

Sweet Gum Tree

Posted by on 5:57 am in Tree | Comments Off on Sweet Gum Tree

Sweet Gum Tree

The sweet gum tree produces that little ball with tiny horns that hurts so much to step on barefooted. Inside each tiny horn is a capsule which holds two small, winged seeds which drop in the fall. In the winter, one can see these little prickly balls still hanging high in the tree. The leaf of the sweet gum is star-shaped, with five to seven pointed lobes. The leaf somewhat resembles a maple leaf. If in doubt whether the tree is a maple or sweet gum, check the leaf nodes. If the opposite, the tree is maple; if the alternate, sweet gum. Also,...

read more

Park History

Posted by on 5:40 am in Nature | Comments Off on Park History

Park History

William Hibler acquired the property later called Longview Farm, once encompassing over 350 acres, directly from the United States government in the 1820s. The Hibler homestead was not at this location. Upon Hibler’s death, 160 acres of the property was deeded to daughter Susanna. It was immediately sold to a neighbor, James McKenney who resold the property in 1854 to Henry Niebruegge for $4,232. Henry and Clara Niebruegge added another 80 acres to their original 160 in 1856. The 1878 atlas shows a house in the approximate location of...

read more