Rhyolite
Sep22

Rhyolite

1.5 billion years ago Missouri was a vast area of explosive volcanism. Volcanoes and fissures spewed forth upon the earth’s surface thick layers of fast cooling rhyolite lava, volcanic ash, and volcanic fragments. This material can be seen today as hard, blocky rocks in road cuts and on Taum Sauk Mountain about 80 miles South of St. Louis. At Longview Farm Park rhyolites lie about 2800 feet beneath the surface. Some very...

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Beautiful Trees
Sep22

Beautiful Trees

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Black Walnut
Sep22

Black Walnut

Black walnut is one of the most valuable trees in Missouri. Its warm, brown wood is in great demand for furniture, cabinets, and gunstocks. Our state is the greatest production center for walnut wood and has been for over fifty years. The main clue to look for is the nut. It has a grooved shell and grows inside a thick, green husk. These nuts make the walnut tree even more valuable. The husk contains a dark-brown dye which the...

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Sweet Gum Tree
Sep22

Sweet Gum Tree

The sweet gum tree produces that little ball with tiny horns that hurts so much to step on barefooted. Inside each tiny horn is a capsule which holds two small, winged seeds which drop in the fall. In the winter, one can see these little prickly balls still hanging high in the tree. The leaf of the sweet gum is star-shaped, with five to seven pointed lobes. The leaf somewhat resembles a maple leaf. If in doubt whether the tree is a...

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Park History
Sep22

Park History

William Hibler acquired the property later called Longview Farm, once encompassing over 350 acres, directly from the United States government in the 1820s. The Hibler homestead was not at this location. Upon Hibler’s death, 160 acres of the property was deeded to daughter Susanna. It was immediately sold to a neighbor, James McKenney who resold the property in 1854 to Henry Niebruegge for $4,232. Henry and Clara Niebruegge added...

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