Recent Posts From Nature

Park History

William Hibler acquired the property later called Longview Farm, once...

LongView Farm Park

Longview Farm Park, located at 13525 Clayton Road (63141), was purchased...

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Longview Farm Park Events

The major events that are held in Longview Farm Park Events are Fall...

History of Longview Farm Park

Introduction: Longview Farm now remains as an indication of a past period,...

Platin Limestone

Large straight-shelled cephalopods, trilobites and one of the first crinoids...

  • Nature

Park History

William Hibler acquired the property later called Longview Farm, once...

LongView Farm Park

Longview Farm Park, located at 13525 Clayton Road (63141), was purchased...

  • Nature

Park History

William Hibler acquired the property later called Longview Farm, once...

LongView Farm Park

Longview Farm Park, located at 13525 Clayton Road (63141), was purchased...

Woodland Trees

The woodland trails meander throughout a predominately oak-hickory forest. The unique attributes of these two species bring great enjoyment as one walks along the trails. Twenty-seven (27) different species of Missouri Native trees are labeled along the trails for your information.

The bark of the shagbark hickory is most unique and expressive of its name. The post oak has an amazing variety of leaf formations that make a walk through its fallen leaves in Autumn an adventure of discovery.

American Elm

This tree was once the most common shade tree in America. Insects and diseases have killed millions of these trees. It is a native tree in every county of Missouri. This tree has a tendency to fork and develop a wide-spreading crown (like the letter “V” or a vase full of flowers.) This shape is characteristic. The leaves are four to six inches long, elliptical with the tip pointed and the base uneven.

The edges of the leaf are coarsely toothed. Other species of elm include slippery, rock, winged, Chinese, and Siberian elm. All have elliptical, toothed leaves. The seed is shaped like a little wafer with a bump in the middle. The papery margin is the wing to sail on the wind and the bump in the middle is the seed. Botanists call these samaras. Squirrels and birds call them delicious! Gardeners call them a nuisance.

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Park Information

Longview Farm Park –
13525 Clayton Road
Town & Country, MO 63141
30 Acres

Drace Park –
2310 Cedar Valley Lane
Town & Country, MO 63131
9 Acres

Preservation Park –
12625 North 40 Drive
Town & Country, MO 63141
12 Acres[Joint Use with CBC of Additional 20 Acres]